How Did Language Evolve? Biological, Psychological, and Linguistic Perspectives

Ines Adornetti, Alessandra Chiera, Serena Nicchiarelli, Olga Vasileva

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12775/ths.2019.001

Abstract


The topic of language origin and evolution has been consideredfor a long time as a difficult question to address scientifically because of poverty of empirical data and limitations in methodology (Müller, 1861). These considerations have led to the well-known edicts by the Société de Linguistique de Paris in 1866 and the Philological Society of Londonin 1872 that forbade all members from presenting speeches on the topic.


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