McTaggart on time

Nathaniel Goldberg

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12775/LLP.2004.004

Abstract


Contemporary discussions on the nature of time begin with McTaggart, who introduces the distinction between what he takes to be the only two possible realist theories of time: the A-theory, maintaining that past, present, and future are absolute; and the B-theory, maintaining that they are relative. McTaggart argues against both theories to conclude that time is not real. In this paper, I reconstruct his argument against the A-theory. Then, I show that this argument is flawed. Finally, I draw a lesson for those engaged in contemporary discussions on the nature of time.

Keywords


McTaggart; time

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References


McTaggart, John Ellis, “Time”, pp. 8–31 in: The Nature of Existence, vol. 2, C.D. Broad (ed.), New York: Cambridge University Press, 1927.








ISSN: 1425-3305 (print version)

ISSN: 2300-9802 (electronic version)

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