Abudance Of The Natural Resources As A Factor, Which Destimulates Economic Growth. Looking For The Dutch Disease In Russia

Kornelia Gierczyńska

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12775/OeC.2010.003

Abstract


In general thinking, countries possessing rich natural resource deposits are blessed, as resource abundance has seemingly positive correlation with the wealth and economic development of a nation. However, experience shows that countries endowed with extreme amounts of natural resources have found themselves in a serious misuse and on a damaging growth path. Extraordinary resource possession is rather an opportunity than a guarantee for better economic performance. The term “Dutch disease” refers to a situation in which new discoveries of natural resources or sharp rises in commodity prices lead to an increase in the equilibrium real exchange rate, thus undermining the competitiveness of the other tradable sectors in the economy. As suggested in the academic literature the Dutch disease is associated ith four main symptoms: a slowdown in manufacturing output, a booming non-tradable sector, an increase in real wages and real exchange rate appreciation. Russia’s oil price dependence and the risk of the Dutch disease are often considered as the main long-term challenges to sustainable growth in the country. In this regard, it is worth studying the available economic data for evidence of these phenomena. Russia’s oil price dependence and the risk of the Dutch disease are often considered as the main long-term challenges to sustainable growth in the country. In this regard, it is worth studying the available economic data for evidence of these phenomena. The main section examines whether in Russia: exports have become more biased towards oil and gas, GDP growth has become more sensitive to oil price fluctuations, the economy is showing symptoms of the Dutch disease

Keywords


The Dutch Disease; natural resources; resource movement effect; spending effect

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